2023-2024 Official University Academic Catalog 
    
    Feb 24, 2024  
2023-2024 Official University Academic Catalog

Academic Policies



This section of the catalog contains information related to all degree program requirements.

Class Attendance

Students are expected to attend and actively participate in all classes and assignments. Participation requirements are outlined in the Student Handbook and may vary depending on the specific program of study. The professor may establish policies and consequences for each course and publish those policies in the course syllabus.

Course Exemption

Students may gain exemption from taking courses in an academic area by demonstrating proficiency through satisfactory performance on a comprehensive examination taken at LETU. While exemption from taking the course may be earned in this manner, students will not receive college credit. The department chair will determine if this type of exemption will be allowed. Students may replace such exempted hours with electives approved by their advisor.

Declare or Change Major

General Information for Students

The candidate for any degree should carefully study all course and other requirements for that degree and for graduation. Each student is responsible for all requirements as stated and careful attention to the program will result in completion of the requirements for graduation in the minimum time.

The minimum requirement for an LETU  undergraduate degree is 120 semester hours including at least 30 semester hours of 3000 or 4000 level courses; however, some degrees require more than these minimums.

Approximately the first 64 hours required for the bachelor’s degree are devoted to general or introductory study in diverse fields. This diversification is intended to give breadth of view and to assist students in selecting a field of specialization.

Majors

The degree audit, a computer-generated report outlining the student’s academic progress toward completion of a specified degree program, is available via MyLETU. The student can access a current degree audit by the first semester, and the student is expected to monitor the degree audit each semester until graduation. University requirements for the major, such as minimum hours, residence, advanced work, and GPA, are listed under the “Degree Requirements” for each academic unit.

Concentrations

A concentration is a specialized course of study for undergraduate degrees. Some undergraduate majors include a built-in concentration, for others a concentration must be selected. The number of hours in the concentration varies by program. Concentrations are linked to specific majors. See specific degree requirements for additional information.

Students who complete all requirements for two or more concentrations and who also meet the minimum number of required resident hours will be granted those concentrations. Students should contact the Registrar’s Office for assistance with understanding the presentation and order of these concentrations on transcripts and diplomas.

Specializations

A specialization is a specialized course of study for graduate degrees. Some graduate degrees include a built-in specialization, for others a specialization must be selected. The number of hours in the specialization varies by program. Specializations are linked to specific degrees. See specific degree requirements for additional information.

Students who complete all requirements for two or more specializations and who also meet the minimum number of required resident hours will be granted those specializations. Students should contact the Registrar’s Office for assistance with understanding the presentation and order of these specializations on transcripts and diplomas.

Minors

A student may elect a minor consisting of a minimum of 18 semester hours in a designated area of study, which may be from a different school than the major field (at least 6 hours completed at LeTourneau University). Specific requirements for the minor, as designated by the academic units, are listed with “Degree Requirements” and in the department sections of this catalog. Unless otherwise specified, grades of “D” or better are accepted in the minor.

Change of Majors

Students may change majors by completing a Request to Add, Change, or Drop a Major obtained from the Office of the Registrar. The change of major must be approved by the department chair of the new major. The student will come under the most recent catalog year for the program requirements for the new major.

When an undergraduate student changes majors, certain D, F, and WF grades may be removed from the cumulative GPA if the following guidelines are met:

  • The courses must have been taken at LETU prior to or during the semester in which the student changes majors.
  • Grades can only be removed from courses that fall into a General Elective category for the new major.
  • The grades that have been removed from the computation of the cumulative GPA will not count toward hours attempted, hours completed, or total grade points, but the course name and original grade will remain on the transcript.
  • This policy may only be used once at LETU.
  • Graduation honors will be determined by considering the full cumulative GPA of all course work attempted at the University, including any courses with grades that have been deleted from the cumulative GPA when changing majors.

Majors, Minors, and Degrees: Dual and Second Dual Minors

The University will permit students to pursue a dual minor. Students must satisfy all of the requirements for each minor.

Dual Degrees

Undergraduate students may choose to receive two degrees at the same graduation ceremony, in which case the following conditions apply:

  •  The first degree is the degree of the declared major containing the greatest number of required semester credit hours. The student must complete a minimum of 30 hours above the number required by the major of the first degree. None of those 30 hours can be in courses applied to the major of the first degree, but they may be in courses required in the other major. In all cases, the student must meet all requirements for each declared major in each degree.
  •  At least 12 semester hours of the 30 must be upper division credit and in a different field from that of the major in the first degree.
  •  A separate application for graduation for each degree must be submitted at the same time, accompanied by the payment of one graduation fee plus one reapplication for graduation fee.

Second Majors

Second majors offer students the opportunity to earn one degree in one program supplemented by a rich intellectual experience in a second field of specialization outside of that primary program. The second major offers students the option of studying two subjects from two different programs while earning a baccalaureate degree in the first major without the requirement of earning a second baccalaureate degree in the second major. General requirements for coursework and progression standards for primary majors also apply to secondary majors.

This option allows a student from one degree program to earn a second major from a participating department within a different program by fulfilling the requirements set forth by that participating department but without requiring students to enroll in the additional courses that comprise that other program’s core curriculum. Through the second major option, upon graduation a student earns one degree from LETU (through the fulfillment of all requirements from the student’s primary program). Although the student will not be awarded a second degree, the student’s transcript will reflect that the student earned a second major in that second area of study.

Students should consult the departmental sections within this catalog to determine specific requirements for second majors. Additionally, students must contact the secondary department as early in their undergraduate studies as possible to determine if a second major is available and to receive advising.

Second Degrees

Students may qualify for a second, and different, bachelor’s degree at LETU by completing a minimum of 30 semester hours (60 hours if the first degree was obtained elsewhere) beyond the requirements for the first degree. These hours must include all major requirements pertaining to the second degree that were not included in the first degree program. The major for the second degree must differ from the first and must include at least 12 hours of additional 3000 or 4000 level courses.

Students seeking a minor on a second degree must choose a different field from the major or minor on the first degree and must include a minimum of 9 additional hours taken in residence beyond the hours in that field taken on the first degree. At least 6 hours of the additional 9 hours must be advanced. All of the basic requirements for all minors also apply.

Students already possessing a bachelor’s degree may choose to receive a second degree, in which case the following conditions apply:

  •  The student must successfully complete all required work for the second degree.
  •  A minimum of 30 semester hours must be completed in residence work at LETU above that necessary for the degree requiring the greater number of hours and not applied toward a previous degree.
  •  At least 12 semester hours must be upper division credit and in a different field from that chosen as the major for the first bachelor’s degree.
  •  All requirements listed for the second degree must be satisfied according to the latest catalog in effect at the time of official declaration of major for the degree.
  •  A separate application for graduation must be submitted for the second degree accompanied by the payment of a second graduation fee.

Graduate students may qualify for a second, and different, master’s degree at LETU by completing a minimum of 15 semester hours after the first degree was awarded. These hours must include all major requirements pertaining to the second degree that were not included in the first degree program. All requirements for the second degree must be met. These courses must be completed at LeTourneau University.

Final Exams

Final examinations are an important part of the course work. Students are expected to take final examinations during the regularly scheduled time at the end of each semester. Seniors in bachelor’s degree programs may be exempt from final examinations in 15-week courses in the semester in which they participate in the graduation ceremony if they meet the following requirement. The student must have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 and a B in the course, except in courses required for FAA certification and those required by the faculty member or academic program. This policy may only be used one time. As a courtesy, the faculty member should be notified at least three weeks before the end of the course that exemption from the final exam is desired. Eligibility for this benefit will be verified by the Office of the Registrar. Students completing a field experience in their final semester may be exempt from final exams in the next to the last semester providing all other requirements are met.

Fresh Start Rule

The Fresh Start Rule applies to former LETU undergraduate students who return to the University after an absence of at least three years and whose prior academic records were below acceptable standards. A student with this circumstance may petition the Office of the Provost for implementation of the Fresh Start Rule. If the petition is accepted, the cumulative GPA for the previous LETU work will be suppressed, allowing the student to resume undergraduate studies with a fresh GPA. All grades, credits, and courses formerly taken will remain on the transcript. Graduation honors will be determined by considering the full cumulative GPA of all course work attempted at the University, including the GPA for the previous LETU work that was suppressed prior to the beginning of the Fresh Start Rule.

Grade Changes and Appeals

Once a grade has been submitted to the Office of the Registrar, only the instructor can change the grade, except in the case of a grade appeal. If a student believes that a final course grade has been improperly awarded, the student may appeal the grade by following these steps:

  •  The student must contact the instructor in writing to seek a solution no later than four weeks after the end of the course. The instructor must notify the student of the decision within one week of being contacted by the student. If the instructor decides that a grade change is warranted, the instructor must submit a change of grade form approved by the dean of the academic school to the Office of the Registrar.
  •  If the decision of the instructor is not acceptable to the student, an appeal may be made in writing to the dean of the academic school within one week after notification by the instructor. The written appeal must specify both the complaint and the action requested. The dean must notify the student of the decision within two weeks.
  •  If the decision of the dean is not acceptable to the student, a written appeal may be made to the Office of the Provost within one week after notification by the dean. The Office of the Provost will seek a solution or may refer the matter to the Admissions and Standards Committee. The decision of the Office of the Provost is final unless the Office of the Provost refers the appeal to the Admissions and Standards Committee, in which case the decision of that committee becomes final.

Probation and Suspension

To be in good academic standing all students must make satisfactory progress toward earning a degree. Academic status will be re-evaluated three times per year, at the end of every fall and spring semesters, and at the end of all summer terms. A change in academic status is effective for the next semester or term the student is taking classes through LeTourneau, which is not necessarily the next term classes are available.  (A spring change in status could be applicable for the summer or fall, depending when the next class/s are taken.) Cumulative and term GPAs are calculated only on hours taken through LeTourneau University.

University policy requires that students who assume responsibilities in which they represent LeTourneau University to the public (i.e., intercollegiate athletics, music groups, etc.) must be in good standing, academically and behaviorally, and must make reasonable progress toward an educational goal. Participation in some organized extracurricular activities may be limited to those students who are enrolled full-time and pursuing a degree program.

Any undergraduate student with a cumulative GPA that is less than 2.00 will be placed on academic probation, pre-suspension, impending suspension, or suspension.  A student who raises their cumulative GPA to 2.00 or greater will return to good academic standing.  When a student’s cumulative GPA first drops below a 2.00 they will be placed on academic probation for the following semester.  Academic Probation recommends participation in programs designed to help students succeed academically.  At the end of their semester on academic probation, if their cumulative GPA is still less than 2.00 and their semester GPA is 3.00 or higher they will continue on academic probation for the following semester.  If their cumulative GPA is less than 2.00 and their semester GPA is less than 3.00, they will be placed on pre-suspension for the following semester.  Pre-suspension requires participation in programs designed to help students succeed academically.  At the end of the semester a student is on pre-suspension, if their cumulative GPA is still below a 2.00 but their semester GPA is 3.00 or higher, they will continue on pre-suspension for the following semester.  If their cumulative GPA is less than 2.00 and their semester GPA is less than 3.00, they will be placed on impending suspension for the following semester.  During the semester they are on impending suspension they can take classes and they can also appeal their suspension status, but they will be blocked from pre-registering for future classes.  Appeal instructions will be supplied with the impending suspension notification.  Appeals must be submitted by the date specified with the appeal instructions. At end of the semester a student is on impending suspension, if their cumulative GPA is still below a 2.00 and their appeal, (if any), is denied, they will be suspended from LeTourneau University and not be permitted to continue classes.  If their appeal is granted they may continue for another semester with the status of impending suspension.  Once a student is suspended they must sit out at least one fall or spring semester, after which they may apply for re-admission. 

After your period of suspension, you may apply for readmittance to the University through the Admissions Office at www.letu.edu/admissions. In addition to your application, you must submit an appeal by email to the Office of the Provost (OfficeoftheProvost@letu.edu) that articulates compelling evidence demonstrating changes you have made that will cause you to be successful in your academic pursuits at LeTourneau University.  Your request must be received at least 30 days prior to the beginning of classes. 

Any graduate student with a cumulative GPA that is less than 3.00 will be placed on academic probation, pre-suspension, impending suspension, or suspension.  A student who raises their cumulative GPA to 3.00 or greater will return to good academic standing.  When a student’s cumulative GPA first drops below a 3.00 they will be placed on academic probation for the following semester.  Academic Probation recommends participation in programs designed to help students succeed academically.  At the end of their semester on academic probation, if their cumulative GPA is still less than 3.00 and their semester GPA is 3.50 or higher they will continue on academic probation for the following semester.  If their cumulative GPA is less than 3.00 and their semester GPA is less than 3.50, they will be placed on pre-suspension for the following semester.  Pre-suspension requires participation in programs designed to help students succeed academically.  At the end of the semester a student is on pre-suspension, if their cumulative GPA is still below a 3.00 but their semester GPA is 3.50 or higher, they will continue on pre-suspension for the following semester.  If their cumulative GPA is less than 3.00 and their semester GPA is less than 3.50, they will be placed on impending suspension for the following semester.  During the semester they are on impending suspension they can take classes and they can also appeal their suspension status, but they will be blocked from pre-registering for future classes.  Appeal instructions will be supplied with the impending suspension notification.  Appeals must be submitted by the date specified with the appeal instructions.  At end of the semester a student is on impending suspension, if their cumulative GPA is still below a 3.00 and their appeal, (if any), is denied, they will be suspended from LeTourneau University and not be permitted to continue classes.  If their appeal is granted they may continue for another semester with the status of impending suspension.  Once a student is suspended they must sit out at least one fall or spring semester, after which they may apply for re-admission.

After your period of suspension, you may apply for readmittance to the University through the Admissions Office at www.letu.edu/admissions.  In addition to your application, you must submit an appeal by email to the Office of the Provost (OfficeoftheProvost@letu.edu) that articulates compelling evidence demonstrating changes you have made that will cause you to be successful in your academic pursuits at LeTourneau University.  Your request must be received at least 30 days prior to the beginning of classes.  

Any student who is suspended a second time or who demonstrates a deficiency that makes it unreasonable to anticipate eventual completion of degree requirements will be subject to academic dismissal.  Dismissal can be appealed and details for the appeal will be supplied with the notice of dismissal.  Since dismissal is intended to be permanent, only the lapse of a year or more and a drastic change in circumstances can justify application for readmission, which may be granted in rare instances. After your period of dismissal, you may apply for readmittance to the University through the Admissions Office at www.letu.edu/admissions.  In addition to your application, you must submit an appeal by email to the Office of the Provost (OfficeoftheProvost@letu.edu) that articulates compelling evidence demonstrating changes you have made that will cause you to be successful in your academic pursuits at LeTourneau University.  Your request must be received at least 30 days prior to the beginning of classes.  

Questions concerning the Probation and Suspension Policy can be directed to AdmissionsandStandards@letu.edu.

LeTourneau University Academic Integrity Policy


A foundation of mutual trust is essential to the learning community. Students and faculty break that trust when they violate ethical standards that the community of scholars expects each member to uphold.
 

Academic dishonesty is a serious breach of trust within the LeTourneau University community because it violates the regard for truth that is essential to genuine learning and Christian consistency. From a broader perspective, it hurts both offending students and their peers who complete their work with integrity. Therefore, the LeTourneau University community will not tolerate academic dishonesty and encourages a student who experiences particular difficulties in a course to discuss the problem with the instructor rather than succumb to the pressure to commit academic dishonesty.
 

Academic dishonesty is not qualitatively different from other types of dishonesty. It consists of misrepresentation in an attempt to deceive. In an academic setting, this dishonesty may take various forms including, but not limited to, the following:
 

Cheating

  • Obtaining, distributing, or using a test, unauthorized information regarding a test, or other unauthorized assignment material without prior permission from the instructor for the current course.
  • Using unauthorized files, tests, problems, lab reports, or other assignment material from previous classes other than allowed by the instructor for the current course.
  • Copying or using unauthorized technological or print aids in tests, examinations, or
  • laboratory reports.
  • Using computational software/hardware, generative artificial intelligence (AI) tools, or the like, without prior permission from the instructor of the current course.
  • Submitting AI-generated material as one’s own work.
  • Looking at an examination paper or answer sheet of another student.
  • Cooperating or aiding in any of the above.
     

Plagiarizing

  • Submitting someone else’s words, works, or ideas as if they were one’s own.
  • Presenting the words, works, or ideas of someone else without accurately or completely citing the source.
  • Self-plagiarizing or recycling (without prior permission from the instructor of the current course) one’s own work as original in one course when it was created in another course or for another assignment.


University Responses to Academic Dishonesty

Cases of academic dishonesty are typically first handled by the instructor teaching the course in which the violation occurs. If an instructor finds a student guilty of violating the Academic Integrity Policy, the possible sanctions he or she may impose include but are not limited to the following:
 

  • A requirement to redo the paper or assignment.
  • A significant score reduction, failing grade, or zero given on the specific exam, paper, or assignment.
  • A grade reduction or failing grade given for the course.

 

The above are examples of typical sanctions, but the faculty member is free to determine an appropriate course penalty given the severity of the specific violation. This is left to the discretion of the instructor, but he or she may elect to consult a supervisor or dean, and/or the Associate Provost for Student Success.


Reporting the Violation to the Academic Integrity Council

The faculty member should report the violation to the Academic Integrity Council by completing an Academic Integrity Violation Reporting Form. This must be done within 10 business days of discovery of the violation. This system will help identify students who may be violating the academic integrity policy in multiple courses, allowing for better student remediation and a more appropriate disciplinary response.
 

The Associate Provost for Student Success will register the violation in the student’s file for future reference should there be subsequent offenses or decisions for campus leadership positions. For repeat violations or at the request of the faculty member in complex cases, the Associate Provost for Student Success may convene the Academic Integrity Council to determine the appropriate disciplinary response in the particular course and/or with regard to the student’s future at the University. When the Academic Integrity Council is convened, it must be within 10 business days of receiving the report. The purpose of the Council is to allow for better student remediation and consider a wise disciplinary response to the particular situation.
 

The Academic Integrity Council will issue the student a formal letter of review to inform him or her of the University’s identification of the violation status and describe any imposed sanctions. For severe or repeat offenses, the Academic Integrity Council may apply sanctions including, but not limited to, probation, suspension, or expulsion from the University.
 

Violations of the Academic Integrity Policy may be considered when determining student eligibility for applicable internal positions, such as IMPACT and student worker positions. All records of academic integrity violations are maintained by the Office of the Provost. Additionally, academic integrity violations that lead to dismissal from the University are permanently noted on the student’s academic transcript.

 

Appeals Process

  • The student will have an opportunity to appeal any sanctions imposed by either the accusing instructor or the Academic Integrity Council. For sanctions imposed by the instructor, the student is encouraged to first make an appeal to the instructor within 10 business days of receipt of the sanction.
  • If the instructor rejects the student’s appeal, the student has 10 business days to appeal to the Academic Integrity Council. To initiate the appeals process, a student must submit a request for an appeal in writing to the Associate Provost for Student Success. This request must include the name of the student, the course in which the incident took place, and a brief explanation of the incident.
  • Prior to hearing any appeal, the Academic Integrity Council will invite the accusing instructor and student to submit written statements. The Council may decide to request in-person statements from both parties.
  • For any appeal of an initial Academic Integrity Council decision, the Provost will be the final decision maker and determine whether to dismiss, reduce, increase, or uphold the sanctions. Appeals to the Provost must include a detailed statement describing the grounds for appeal.
  • Grounds for appeal:
  • Procedural error that would significantly affect the outcome of the case
  • New information that was not available at the time the sanction was imposed
  • Sanction imposed is grossly disproportionate to the violation
  • Not Grounds for Appeal
  • Disagreement with findings
  • Disagreement with sanctions


Further Information

Instructors should include a statement of adherence to the Academic Integrity Policy in their course syllabi and remind students of the University’s policies and procedures regarding cheating and plagiarism.


Composition of the Academic Integrity Council

The Academic Integrity Council is a standing committee of the University with membership chosen annually by the Committee on Committees. The Council shall consist of the Associate Provost for Student Success, the Dean of Students, two faculty members (one representing traditional undergraduate programs and one representing online graduate programs), and a student representative. Additional faculty may be invited to participate as subject matter experts should an academic integrity case require expertise not shared by the standing members.